Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Strandberg, Mathias
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Department of Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research, Gothenburg.
    Arlöv2018In: Namn och bygd, ISSN 0077-2704, Vol. 106, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arlöv is the name of a former village (now part of the city of Malmö) in the parish of Burlöv in south-western Skåne in the far south of Sweden. The first element of the name has been etymologised as the genitive Ara of an Old Danish personal name Ari and, later, as the stem of an Old Danish appellative *arth, a cognate of Old West Norse ǫrð ‘what grows, harvest, corn’. Both of these etymologies are problematic since they require conspicuously early deletion of -a- and -th-, respectively, pre-dating the oldest record of the name, Arleue, from around 1120. I suggest instead that Arlöv contains the genitive ār of the Old Danish appellative ā ‘river’, referring to the river Sege å directly adjacent to the original site of the village. The long a of the first element has been shortened by what is known as compound reduction. This etymology is consistent with the earliest recorded occurrences of the name, as well as with the topography of the site. Furthermore, it involves a well-known and frequent appellative with topographical reference.

  • 2.
    Strandberg, Mathias
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Department of Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research, Gothenburg.
    Dialektgeografiska frågor kring tonaccent och betoning hos sammansatta ord i nordiska dialekter2017In: Ideologi, identitet, intervention: Nordisk dialektologi 10 / [ed] Jan-Ola Östman, Caroline Sandström, Pamela Gustavsson, Lisa Södergård, Helsingfors: Nordica vid Finska, finskugriska och nordiska institutionen, Helsingfors universitet , 2017, p. 281-292Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Central Standard Swedish, compound words generally carry primary stress on the firstelement and the tonal word accent 2. However, some North Germanic Dialects evince variationin compound words regarding both tonal accent and stress, giving rise to dialect geographicand historical questions. Dialect geographic as well as structural arguments canbe made that the variable tonal accent system found today in the very south of Sweden andin most of Norway was once present in all of Scandinavia and that the Central Swedish andNorth Norwegian system with general accent 2 in compound words is a relatively latedevelopment from this system. Second element stress, conversely, is best understood as aninnovation, developed in different ways from different tonal make-ups of accent 2, resultingin varying conditions for second-element stress across dialects.

  • 3.
    Strandberg, Mathias
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Department of Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research, Gothenburg.
    [Rec. av] Kalle Lind, Skånsk-svensk ordbok från abekatt till övanpo2017In: Svenska landsmål och svenskt folkliv, ISSN 0347-1837, Vol. 139, p. 254-257Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Strandberg, Mathias
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Department of Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research, Gothenburg.
    Skånska konamn på -a utgående från färgteckning m.m.2018In: Katharina och namnen: Vänskrift till Katharina Leibring på 60-årsdagen den 20 januari 2018 / [ed] Leila Mattfolk & Kristina Neumüller (huvudred.), Josefine Devine, Elin Pihl, Lennart Ryman & Annette C. Torensjö, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2018, p. 209-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Strandberg, Mathias
    et al.
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Department of Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research, Gothenburg.
    Skott, FredrikInstitute for Language and Folklore, Department of Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research, Gothenburg.
    Svenska landsmål och svenskt folkliv: Tidskrift för talspråksforskning, folkloristik och kulturhistoria2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf